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Elena Bajic
2006

(23)

5 stars

(42)

4 stars

(18)

3 stars

(12)

2 stars

(0)

1 star

Recommend to a friend

70%

Say this is a great place to work

68%

Proud to have on resume

85%

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

Instilled a culture of loyalty to the brand and people.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

Comradery is imporantant to finding success here.

Employee - Vice President (VP, SVP, EVP, etc.)

A place that had an aggressive work culture.

Employee - Vice President (VP, SVP, EVP, etc.)

Need to develop yourself both personally and professionally to be able to navigate PepsiCo.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

Had a great corporate culture.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

You will feel part of a Team w/ an extremely stong CEO at the reigns.

Employee - Analyst / Associate

During my tenure, I felt that more could be done to promote work life balance such as work from home options, on site day care.

Employee - Director

The culture was a bit too fatalistically competitive. We used to say that a bullet was fired the day you were hired, and that you would spend your career there trying to outrun it, but eventually it would catch up to you.

Employee - Director

Very professional work culture, however also very political.

Employee - Director

Culture cultivated qualities such as entrepreneurial, empowerment and creativity.

Employee - Director

You need to be a self-starter. Driven. Results oriented. Creative. Strong negotiator. Passion to WIN!

Employee - Director

The place where you either go up or out. Had a tendency towards "boys club."

Employee - Director

I'd make changes in the Human Resources Department.

Employee - Director

Work hard, play hard type work culture.

Employee - Director

Know the people, company-wide culture is important; but individuals with their own agendas and incentives play a key role.

Employee - Vice President (VP, SVP, EVP, etc.)

The ability to retain talent was a huge issue during my time there.

Employee - Analyst / Associate

I found that nepotism was common practice in this organization. If you didn't know someone, you weren't provided with opportunities as readily as those who know someone within the organization.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

While PepsiCo is doing lots of things right, if I may, I have three suggestions to change and they include, but not limited to are 1. While PepsiCo’s current “talent management system” has a good process in place to identify their top talent, that process in some cases is prejudiced, to hire/promote leaders mostly from the pool of MBA’s from top 10 schools only. Granted the top 10 schools have some great talent, however, research has consistently proven that there are always some hidden gems buried deep within regional schools as well -- rightfully so, most innovative companies in the silicon valley these days, have started casting their net wide (into regional schools) for their top talent. An implication is, PepsiCo like other silicon valley companies, must change its talent management system and start casting their net wide to hire/promote the so called hidden gems from the regional schools(including international schools), over and beyond their top 10 schools. 2. While PepsiCo’s current “performance management system” has a good process in place to assess the performance of their employees, that process in most cases puts tremendous pressure on managers (especially the middle managers) to fit their employees into a bell curve within their consensus based calibration process culture. An implication is managers, in some cases gang up and agree on their favorites beforehand and then use the calibration sessions to build justifications in reverse for their favorites, as opposed to truly assessing the performance of all employees. An implication is, PepsiCo must consider changing their performance management system with a coaching/learning driven performance enhancing system, as explored by few leading edge companies. 3. While PepsiCo’s current succession panning system has a good process in place to identify their future leaders, that process in some cases again is skewed towards performance (which is already flawed as explained in my earlier point), without giving enough weightage to potential, as research has consistently proven that performance and potential are two sides of the same coin called “HUMAN CAPITAL VALUE”. For example, while assessing the financial capital value of a company, most valuation methodologies assess value based on future projected financial performance (which is potential) and not based on past performance alone. However, when it comes to assessing human capital value, most companies including PepsiCo, assess employees purely based on performance (which is again biased, based on the opinion of few). This is where I suggest that PepsiCo to balance performance and potential within their succession planning system, especially when selecting future leaders to run the company including their BU’s.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

While Culture can been defined in many different ways by experts, for the purposes of this survey, culture in my mind, is an “unwritten” momentum that manifest as a sweet spot, at the intersection of interactions and interventions. by releasing the right dosage of interaction and intervention energies, depending upon the context. Interaction is nothing but conversational exchanges among peer groups whereas intervention is a instruction to change the narrative of those conversations from leadership. This sweet spot culture spectrum, spans from intangible cues (like badges, symbols, unwritten water cooler conversations) on one side of the spectrum to the explicit interventions (like rules, policies, guidelines, instructions, command etc.) on the other end. Most companies’ culture index falls somewhere within that spectrum and PepsiCo in my mind falls somewhere in the middle (or 50% mark) of the culture spectrum. If I have to give an example of PepsiCo culture, it is highly competitive culture that, when it comes to being part of the top team, one has to fully in believe in the vision of the top leaders (or you are out) and there is nothing in between. That said, a culture is deemed a best culture, only when a company figures out a cultural momentum of a exhibiting situational culture indexes (like leadership) as per the situation -- and this perhaps is an opportunity area for PepsiCo to improve upon.

Employee - Manager / Senior Manager

PepsiCo in my mind is a c-suite breeding factory and so, there is no doubt in my mind that even a middle level manager in PepsiCo is well equipped to become a c-suite leader elsewhere, even if he/she does not get an opportunity to become one there (due to unavoidable factors beyond one’s control like politics etc.).